Sunday, April 15, 2012

Green Aesthetics

IT IS all a matter of personal preference and you probably cannot read too much into a politician's taste in art, but there is something about this particular picture which makes you wonder what sort of a person would hang it on their lounge wall.


Could the appeal lie in all that dripping blood?

24 comments:

  1. I like art though I have to say that piece is truly disturbing. Painted by a Cpllingwood supporter with a crystal meth addiction?

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  2. Looks more to me like the tree, representing the greens, is sick and rotten to the core, and the skulls represent humanity smothered under green bureaucracy.

    Art is in the eye of the beholder, after all.

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  3. Hit the link and discover an artist's totalitarian manifesto, a will to be the handmaiden of Gaia, Destroyer of Human Desecrators (unless they wise up to what it really means to be green- the approved version) and a politician who concurs, or so it seems.

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  4. Perhaps this might help with sorting out what is 'green':
    http://www.pantone.com/pages/pantone/pantone.aspx?ca=34&pg=20108

    Cheers

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  5. Perhaps it should be compulsory for political candidates to reveal — in addition to their financial interests — what is in their art collections.
    Aviva is to be admired for her modesty. She has carefully hidden the academic qualifications that allow her to call herself an eco-scientist.

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  6. PhillipGeorge(c)2012April 16, 2012 at 7:52 AM

    This immediately reminded me of the arrestingly dark art of H R Giger - who perhaps did more for Ridley Scott's Alien than Ridley Scott did. I'd almost call this night mare scene pathological. Death is ugly -

    so just get it over an done with now. Just be born again. Its Free. Its a 100% guaranteed no faults assurance scheme.

    Realism couldn't be better. Even in Flanders poppies grew magnificently.

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  7. In terms of technique, theme, content (blood, skulls and stuff) and, of course, 'artist's statement', this is the standard of work that you would expect to find at a year 12 art show at a suburban 'Secondary College'. Clumsy, derivative and immature, but if you judge art by whether it confirms your political prejudices...

    Consuela Potez

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    1. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.April 16, 2012 at 1:57 PM

      'Art' that is merely clumsily political is so predictable it loses all aesthetic and emotional possibilities. Give me a good Miro anyday for an evocation of human beings in nature's mystery. Woman, bird, stars, sky. Unbeatable. Instead, this sort of tripe.

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    2. Even better, Miro and music. Great album, going dirt cheap. Even with postage it'll cost just $A10.

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  8. Weirdo or idiot. In Christine Milne's case, that's a 20:80 percent split.
    Mainstream newspapers should be pointing this story out.

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  9. What sort of person?

    A very miserable person, one whose eyes have become increasingly narrow over the years, one who only smiles when there is the whiff of extra power to be had, one who doesn't think much of her own species, one who is economically and scientifically illiterate, and one who is prepared to wreck the environment with wind "farms".

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    1. Spot on - she appears to me to have become very shrewish in looks and demeanor over the years.
      I wonder if the job of dreaming up lies and deceit will make her the Dorian Gray of the watermelons.

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  10. Given that I put blood and bone on the garden each week I'm not too fussed.

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  11. That's a private collection for which one feels little envy.
    Speaking of the 'arts' (or the pretend arts), went to Lake Macquarie art gallery for a perusal last week. It was without doubt the biggest load of boring nonsense ever put in front of the public. One half was something to do with aborigines and their great difficulties - a few pretty photos and not much else.
    The other half was called Solsickness or some such twaddle. It was purported to be about how people can feel homesick in their own homes because of change. When I say people I mean of course aborigines, and when I say change I mean of course evil mining. Again, a bunch of photos and pottery, a fishing net strewn on the floor... The only interesting part was a huge projection movie of coal mining operations which was quite interesting to watch. Presumably it was there to show the evil up close and personal, but in fact was a tribute to the human endeavour involved in such huge projects (the exhibitors could have had no concept that this was the actual effect).
    I was the only person at the exhibit at the time, not surprisingly. I'm guessing my rates paid for it - supporting the hard core Lefties who are too lazy and/or stupid to go and work in the mines.

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  12. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.April 16, 2012 at 9:48 AM

    We know what sort of person would like that unpleasant mess on their walls, Prof. Someone who thinks people are not very important at all in the scheme of things.

    Thanks for the link, Prof. Another fine and quirky piece of Bunyip investigation.

    Hello, Christine Milne. Let's make it goodbye, as soon a possible.

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  13. "Sick" spring to mind, Prof.
    And the Education Dept of Tasmanias'gain, is definitely our loss....Yes, I did get that right.

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  14. I believe Lee Rhiannon has commissioned a re-imagining of Goya's Saturn Devouring His Son.

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  15. What sort of person would even paint it?
    On reflection, Hannah Aviva

    Charles Bourbaki

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  16. Might I react to that "piece of art"??

    EWWWWW!!

    Come to think of it, I react to Christine Milne in somewhat the same way!!

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  17. Speaking of blood. Brown isn't the only Green warrior who has resigned lately.

    http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/04/14/david-suzuki-resigns-to-save-foundation-from-bully-charitable-status-threats/?__lsa=324faaac

    Scott

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  18. In a way, she's arguably a political experiment. As far as I'm aware she's the first post-menopausal, holus bolus, leader of a major party. I may be wrong but I can't remember any (and yes I'm aware of Janine Haines and Gillard). In terms of votes I think they would have done better with Hanson-Young, who's clearly fertile.

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  19. What is the meaning of the stapled-close vagina on the right hand of the picture? On the other hand, the entire picture could be depiction of the naked lower portions of Gaia's anatomy in the act of excreting over humanity's progress, including its very own evolution.

    Cruel nasty goddess that Gaia!.

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  20. Well looking at the picture you've got blood and bone, which is a fertilizer, thus I assume a fertility symbol. It appears to be coming out of what might be considered a vagina, or more possibly a rectal orifice considering the political views of the yartist. If this is the case you could see the blood and bone as excreta, also a fertilizer. So the fertilizer symbol works either way.

    Thus you have an artwork implying the gender neutral fertization of ..... what? Perhaps the blood and bone is meant to represent birth, so its got more of a feminist aspect there.

    I'm afraid after that I've run out of ideas and interest in the picture.

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  21. Is that Ossie Ostrich in the top left hand corner?

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